• Gluten, Guts, and Genius: An Ambiguous Connection?

February 16, 2017

Gluten, Guts, and Genius: An Ambiguous Connection?

Blog

Research on the human body continues to expand, as the intricate jigsaw puzzle we call “optimal health” presents more mysteries than it exposes. However, it appears as though research and science is catching up, albeit slowly, and making a scene that makes sense.

One of the biggest mysteries of recent has been this whole gluten-free movement. Why are so many people moving this way? What’s the big deal? Isn’t this just for those with Celiac Disease? 

A newfound field of research has opened up the possibility that what you eat may affect how you think. It’s to do with something called the “Second Brain” and we’re not talking about technology. We’re talking about your stomach.

Just when we thought the jigsaw puzzle was complicated enough, it doubled.

Because the research is so new, validations on the suspicions of the gut-brain interaction are scarce. Regardless, there are some very intelligent doctors and scientists making some key discoveries that could hold the answers to questions about autoimmune disease, the Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and many other complications that make us scratch our head. Or perhaps, now our bellies.

The connections between autism and gut dysfunction go back and forth, thus needing more study in order to verify any sort of conclusion. It’s important to take note here, even still, and recognize the factors involved in our diets and lifestyles that could be contributing to these kinds of disorders.

“One of the most common ASD comorbidities is a gut disorder, affecting 9–90% of ASD patients depending on the definitions and the groups studied” (Grubisic, Parpura).

If gut disorder is at all related to any sort of mental disorder, what causes or contributes to it?

That answer may be gluten.

Gluten has this habit of disrupting the entire digestive system, breaking down the ability to adequately function and causing things such as leaky gut and poor or defected mineral absorption. Because the gut communicates so directly with the brain, this can have quite the effect on a plethora of different functions.

In fact, doctors are beginning to discover that even the more common reactions to gut disorder such as anxiety and depression can be linked indirectly to gluten. Once again, back to our jigsaw, pieces that appear to have no connection in solidarity begin to take their place and create a clear picture of the indirect connections that work in tandem. Take out one piece and the picture is incomplete.

So what do we do? Stop eating bread? Bread is delicious.

Perhaps. That may not be the most pleasant answer, but it’s not an eternal condemnation either. Humans have an amazing ability to adapt, and that includes our taste buds. You may be surprised at what you can change in your diet that you will later come to love, by mere adaption. The less you eat gluten, the less your body will crave it.

On the flipside of that, you can do the opposite with vegetables. It’s possible to slowly introduce good, healthy foods into your diet until you come to actually enjoy the flavor rather than endure it.

Take a note from Jessica Seinfield, the successful author of Deceptively Delicious. In her book, she recreates comfort foods to include camouflaged vegetables. Not only is this a great tool to adapt your taste buds to a more vegetable-like attraction, but it’s genius for getting your kids to eat healthy!

Sound familiar?

It is possible to replace gluten with delicious alternatives. While some of the techniques for doing so involve some admittedly complicated recipes, there are other options that do not. Which is why we created a product that delivers with consistency the kind of alternative you can count on, and enjoy. 

Maybe you don’t need to cut out gluten. But maybe there’s something better anyway! And hey, you won’t know until you try it.

Why not try our pizza? The great tasting alternative to conventional gluten pizza! 

 

 

 

 

https://www.aol.com/food/five-delectable-recipes-jessica-seinfeld/#

https://www.glutenfreesociety.org/leaky-gut-syndrome-is-gluten-at-the-root/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4490256/

http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/healthy_aging/healthy_body/the-brain-gut-connection

 




Leave a comment


Also in Blog

What is Ketosis? Part 2
What is Ketosis? Part 2

May 18, 2017

For years, we’ve been taught that glucose is the primary source of energy for the mind and muscles. But did you know there is a contender?

 

Continue Reading

Happy Mothers Day!
Happy Mothers Day!

May 11, 2017

Continue Reading

Kale Yeah! Cauliflower is Here to Stay
Kale Yeah! Cauliflower is Here to Stay

May 04, 2017

Continue Reading

Sign up now for special deals!